This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn more

How To Surf | Positioning To Catch & Surf More Waves EVERY TIME

x

How To SURF: How to easily paddle onto waves! Common Errors & Corrections 2/3 -

Visit our website Mazarine Aqua for more videos, active swimwear and to join in on our surf and paddle boarding events.

Help; I find it hard to paddle onto waves?
This is a common problem for beginners who are just learning how to read a wave, and about the timing needed to catch a wave.

To start, adjust your position as you are probably laying too far back on the board. If your feet are dragging in the water they can act like an anchor, so make sure your board is sitting trim with the ocean.

Next it’s about timing, allow yourself enough time to complete 8 paddle strokes before the waves hits you, this ensures you are generating enough speed, to match the speed of the wave. Without speed, the wave will pass under you, and leave you behind feeling frustrated.

Finally it’s about wave selection and learning where to sit in relation to the break to maximise your chances of catching that wave.
You need to find the peak of the wave, it will be the high point of the swell line (the peak) that tapers off to a low point (the shoulder) if you can see these two points clearly you know the wave is going to peel and you can position yourself effectively.

Often when you’re having problems paddling onto a wave it’s because you’re sitting too wide on the shoulder. This is called shoulder hopping.

To easily paddle onto a wave position yourself close to the peak, this puts you in the best position to utilise the waves speed and surf across the face.

Finding The Surfing Position To Catch The Wave

This session I'm working on getting to the best spot to catch the best waves. Getting to spot X can make each ride better and longer and give you the best chance of catching the wave.

I feature a video on getting to spot X and then I put it into practice in my session.

Featured Video
================================
Spot X by Surf Simply

Music
================================
Hi Q by Diamond Orbitz
AI 2 by Vibe Mountain
Toe Jam by Diamond Orbitz

Editing by
============================
VideoPad

Footage
============================
SoloShot3

check out mormon.org




Learn to surf for beginners. Work on popup, stance, standing on the surfboard, longboard and shortboard. Angle the take off. Keep eyes up and paddle. Choose and select the right wave. Surf small, flat wave and generate power and speed. Pump to get speed. Maneuver and trick like bottom turns, top turns, foaters and cutbacks. Beach breaks. Work on duck dives and turtle rolls. Catch unbroken waves and stay out of the white water. Turn the board with carving and trimming. Drop in with confidence in the line up. Favorite surfers are Ben Gravy, Jamie Obrian, Kelly Slater.
x

3 TIPS TO CATCHING MORE WAVES ON A BUSY POINT BREAK

Surfing popularity has soared in recent years and there are more and more surfers contending for fewer waves than ever before.

Point breaks, in particular, are experiencing high volumes of surfers, all contending for the same waves.

Here are three tips that can help you catch more waves:

1. Find your spot. Before you strap on your leg rope and dive in. Take a moment to look around at the rhythm of the sets and how/ where they're breaking.

For instance: There are three spots to sit on this point break pictured. Most surfers (unless they're advanced) can't make it around each section. Picking your take-off zone and sticking to it will maximize your wave count.

2. Board position. Sit up on your board with it facing at a 45-degree angle to the wave.

In this position, your attention will be out to sea, yet you're still able to turn your board quickly to catch a last minute wave if someone falls off.

3. Paddling. It helps to be a strong paddler at a point-break. Often you don't have the same time as there are so many people fighting for the same wave.

To maximize your paddle speed, place your chin close to your board, and keep your back flat.

📿 To purchase ONLINE COACHING SESSION (S)


📿 To find me on INSTAGRAM:


📿 To find me on TWITTER:


📿 To find me on FACEBOOK:


📿 To CONTACT me :
hello@houseofsurf.co

Surf Tip of The Week - Beginner Surfing Green Wave Pop Up Technique

Ryan with California Surf Experience shares a detail that is often left out of most surf instruction. This detail can make or break your pop up when starting to surf green waves.

Enjoy!
visit us for more coaching / lessons -
x

Top 3 Ways to Paddle Like World Champion Kelly Slater - Surfing Paddling Technique Revealed

Learn to paddle like World Champion Kelly Slater

With new underwater footage and more detailed explanations.

Learn to Surf - Surfing Paddling Technique - How to Catch More Waves with Less Effort:

Learn to surf step number 1: Paddling correctly. How do you catch a wave? Paddle first. Surfing Paddling Technique expert explains how to paddle with less effort, how to paddle faster, and how to prevent injury from occurring due to paddling with poor technique. Also includes how surfers can make good paddling technique automatic and unconscious, so that they can go out and surf, have fun, and not have to think about how they are paddling.









Catch more waves, have more fun.

See you in the water..

HOW TO ANGLE YOUR TAKE OFF

Angling your take off allows a surfer to drop in on waves that are steep. Popping Up with a slight angle will help you get the momentum you need to ride on the wave’s face, to either go right or left.

HOW TO ANGLE YOUR TAKE OFF

Step 1: Choose which way you are going to go - left or right.

Step 2: When you see the wave approaching, paddle into the best position for your take off.

Step 3: Get your board speed up by paddling perpendicular to the beach.

Step 4: In the last 3 strokes start to angle your board to where you want to go.

Step 5: Use the nose of the board as your guide and begin to mentally draw your line down the wave.

Step 6: As you prepare to pop up look in the direction of where you want to go.

Step 7: Place both hands on the deck and open both your shoulders.

Pro tip: Sometimes your outside hand is a little further up the board then your inside hand.

Step 8: Apply more pressure to your inside rail to help angle your board

Step 9: As you lift your chest up, bring your legs through. Place your back leg first on the tail pad and follow through with your front foot.

Step 10: Back foot 90-degree and front foo45-degree angle on the deck of your board.

Step 11: Keep your knees slightly bent and arms close to your body.

Step 12: Surf in the middle of the wave face. Draw an imaginary line that goes down the middle of the wave face.

Pro tip: If you feel like the wave is getting away from you, place your chin towards the board. This will give you extra paddle power and help title the board down the face.

MISTAKES

X If you paddle too much on an angle, you are going to come off the shoulder.

X Angle too little and you'll drop straight down the wave and end up back in the white water.

X Don't paddle into the wave and then begin to angle your board. The board won't start turning until you start moving.

X Just leaning on the rails as you drop down the face won't be enough to angle your board. Those last three paddles really help to encourage your board and body on the angle you wish to take on the shoulder.

X Planning to go down the “middle” of the height of the shoulder is only an indicator. In reality, you will want to draw your line a bit higher than the middle of the wave’s shoulder is breaking fast, and a bit lower when it’s breaking slowly.

X You might be surfing lower on the face than you think you are. Take note that most beginners think they are surfing higher on the wave than they actually are. The idea is to see yourself surfing for pictures and video to verify where you draw your lines.

X If your feet aren't in the correct position your board will go in a different way to where your body is pointing.

X Looking down at your feet as you pop. There is a saying…”If you look down, you go down”. So look at the direction where you want your board to go.

X Arching you back too much. Your momentum needs to be moving forward. If you arch your back too much you are going to disrupt your forward motion.

📿 To purchase ONLINE COACHING SESSION (S)


📿 To find me on INSTAGRAM:


📿 To find me on TWITTER:


📿 To find me on FACEBOOK:


📿 To CONTACT me :
hello@houseofsurf.co
x

How To Catch A Wave

Looking for a tutorial on How To Catch A Wave? This suitable bite-size tutorial explains accurately how it's done, and will help you get good at surfing. Enjoy this advice video from the world's most comprehensive library of free factual video content online.

Subscribe!
Check Out Our Channel Page:
Like Us On Facebook!
Follow Us On Twitter!

Watch This and Other Related films here:

Surfing analysis - Pop-up and go down the line

Here I analyze my surf session from Sept 8, 2018. My goal for the session is choosing the best waves and angling my take off. Keys to success are:

1) Choose big, peeky waves
2) Eyes on the wave lip
3) Fast pop-up
4) Leading arm on the backside

Have fun and keep it real!


Featured Videos
======================
Surfing Raw Edit - Sept 8, 2018


Music
======================
Safety Net by Riot
Sleepy Jake by Silent Partner


Videography
======================
SoloShot3


Editing
======================
SoloShotEdit



checkout mormon.org


Learn to surf for beginners. Work on popup, stance, standing on the surfboard, longboard and shortboard. Angle the take off. Keep eyes up and paddle. Choose and select the right wave. Surf small, flat wave and generate power and speed. Pump to get speed. Maneuver and trick like bottom turns, top turns, floaters and cutbacks. Beach breaks. Work on duck dives and turtle rolls. Catch unbroken waves and stay out of the white water. Turn the board with carving and trimming. Drop in with confidence in the line up. Favorite surfers are Ben Gravy, Jamie Obrian, Kelly Slater.

HOW TO DUCK DIVE

Duck diving is a technique used by surfers to sink their surfboards underwater to enable the wave to roll over them.

This process enables you to push your board underneath the power of the wave, avoiding the white water and continuing out to your take-off spot.

The term duck diving came from surfers witnessing ducks pushing their bodies under the surface of the water.

Duck diving is an art and one which takes a great deal of practice and persistence. Once you master the correct technique, you will conserve more of your energy paddling out and spend more doing what you love...riding the time waves.

In this lesson, we go into detail on the two key factors, good duck diving technique relies on:

1. Timing
2. Speed

How to duck dive
1. Paddle hard to gain speed - the faster you paddle, the easier it is to duck dive

2. Paddle perpendicular to the wave as you approach the oncoming whitewater

3. When you are about 6 feet away from the wave, grab the rails on both sides of your board (near your pectorals)

4.Before the wave hits you, push yourself up to a prone cobra pose

5. Put pressure on your board and lean your upper body over the front part of the board and use your shoulder’s strength to dig the nose underwater

6. You want to bring your board deep and forward, using the speed you have gained from paddling intensely prior the duck dive

Pro tip: Keeping your arms straight will help you get more of the board under the water

7.Apply pressure to the tail by using either your foot or knee

8.Now drive the board down and forward underwater by keeping the pressure on the tail using your foot or knee

9. Push your board as far down as you can simultaneously with your hands and feet. Ideally, you want the surfboard to be parallel to the bottom

10.Pushing the tail down comes quickly after sinking the nose, and together they look like one single motion. Do this quickly to keep moving forward underwater

11.Your other leg is lifted in the air, to help encourage your weight down

12. As the wave passes you overhead, you now need to bend your arms, bring your body close to your board

13.Angle your board back up to the surface and paddle towards the next wave

📿 To purchase ONLINE COACHING SESSION (S)


📿 To find me on INSTAGRAM:


📿 To find me on TWITTER:


📿 To find me on FACEBOOK:


📿 To CONTACT me :
hello@houseofsurf.co

Surfing Paddling Technique - two different types of strokes to use when paddling a surfboard

Ever wonder about whether you are paddling correctly or not? Not a big deal, you say? Well, we spend a majority of our time paddling our surfboard around the lineup. Might be a good idea to learn how to conserve energy when paddling so you can catch more waves with less effort.

In this Surfing Paddling Technique video, we take a look at two different types of strokes from under the water. What is the difference? Why use two different types of strokes?

Learn to Surf - Surfing Paddling Technique - How to Catch More Waves with Less Effort:

Learn to surf step number 1: Paddling correctly. How do you catch a wave? Paddle first. Surfing Paddling Technique expert explains how to paddle with less effort, how to paddle faster, and how to prevent injury from occurring due to paddling with poor technique. Also includes how surfers can make good paddling technique automatic and unconscious, so that they can go out and surf, have fun, and not have to think about how they are paddling.







Catch more waves, have more fun.

See you in the water...


The underwater armstroke for surfing paddling.

There are two things that I want to point out.
First, regardless of the type of stroke used, the hand enters and exits in the same place.
Which means that the body and board move past where the hand is placed. In terms of surfing paddling technique, this means that this is a highly efficient and effective stroke. If the hand exited behind where it entered, then the hand and arm, what we call, “slipped” during the stroke – meaning it didn’t hold the water like it should have. An example of this would be if you were trying to paddle upstream, against the current. The hand would have a hard time holding onto the water because the water is moving in the same direction as the hand.
We don’t want to slip. It happens to the best of us, but we want to try and prevent this from happening using good surfing paddling technique.
The second thing I want to point out is that the 4 phases of the underwater armstroke are present in both stroke patterns. The only difference is the time spent in each phase.
I know, fascinating.
But let me share with you why these two strokes are different. The top one is sprint paddling. Catching a wave, trying to avoid being caught inside. That kind of paddling.
The bottom one is casual paddling. Paddling out, paddling around the lineup, not in a rush type paddling. Trying to conserve energy kind of paddling.
Do you know which kind of paddling we do the most of in a given session?
Yep, casual, trying to conserve energy paddling.
And do you think you might benefit from knowing how to paddle correctly, how to paddle efficiently, and when the time is right, how to paddle with power and speed?
Try it for yourself. Next time you go out, see if you can tell a difference between how you paddle when you are paddling out and how you paddle when you’re catching a wave. See if you can tell an energy difference in the way you paddle. See if your hand and arm are slipping in the water or whether you are holding, and really feeling the water.
And if you’re interested in learning more on correct surfing paddling technique and learning the drills that enhance that understanding… the kind that saves you energy, helps you paddle faster, and helps you prevent any injury due to poor mechanics, sign up for some free training at surfingpaddling.com.

Hope you enjoyed the video.

Leave me a comment or question.
x

What's The Best Time To Go Surf Fishing?

Learn how to determine the best time to go surf fishing in your area. Tides - Tides App

It's no secret that you can improve your catch rate by knowing the best times to fish. So what is the best time to fish? Actually a better questions is What's the best time & place to fish? The short answer is it depends. So let me get into it.

First and foremost you need to understand tide cycles. Before I knew anything about tides, I thought they were the same and changed at the same time everywhere. I couldn't have been more wrong.

In my area we have four tide changes everyday. Some locations only have two changes per day. So the first thing you want to know for your location is what are the tide changes and how does the water level affect my beach.

I'll use my area as an example. The high & low tide times at the beach here only vary about 11 minutes over a 60 mile stretch. So I can pick a tide location to look up somewhere along that stretch and be close enough. Each day the tide changes about an hour later than the previous day and the range from high to low varies about 4 feet. So if I plan to fish with a particular tide change I need to look up the tides for the day I want to fish.

To do that I put an app on my phone called Saltwater Tides. It's a free app available for Android or Apple phones. You can also do a search on the web for tide tables. On the web I like a site called Tides4Fishing.com. As a last resort you could ask one of the local bait shops. I'll get into which tides are best in a bit. So stay with me.

As a general everyday rule without looking up the tides the best time to fish is around sunrise and sunset from dark to light or light to dark. For surf fishing. again without looking up the tides, nighttime is better than daytime because the fish come in closer to feed.

In a previous article I recommended scouting your beach at low tide. Seeing your beach at low tide will help you understand what kind of beach you have. Is it a flat beach also known as a low impact beach, does it have a pretty good slope also known as a high impact beach or is it something in between? Does the beach have any structural changes such as sandbars, holes, points, run outs etc. or is the bottom the same everywhere? A beach that is the same everywhere probably won't hold any fish. Whereas a beach with a lot of structural changes will probably hold a lot of fish. Fish will always hang in and around the structural changes of your beach as long as there is a food source.

Whether you fish high or low tide is based on when you can get your presentation in front of fish.

To do that you need to know when you can reach structure areas in deep enough water for the fish you are targeting. That could be anytime during low or high tide. It depends on your particular beach.

So Let's Review What We Have So Far

Find out what the tide changes are for your area.
Check out your beach at high and low tide and how the tide changes the fishable areas of your beach.
Determine what fishable structure your beach has and where they are.
You need to determine what tides are best for you to reach those structural changes in water deep enough that will hold the fish you are targeting.
If you followed the steps listed above you should have a pretty good idea when the best time to fish is and where. I hope this helps.

One Caveat

Surf conditions will vary. In my area I don't like to fish when there's no surf. I want to see wave action coming in over the sandbars and crashing into the beach. The wave action agitates the food sources and cause the fish to feed and scavenge for food. This is where keeping a log or journal of your fishing trips comes in but I'll leave that for another time

Found Surfing Take Off Mistakes

I found I'm making some common mistakes on my take off. I analyzed myself frame by frame compared to an experience surfer, point out the differences and show a video from Surf Simply explaining what the correct technique is.

You'll also see me working on some novelty tricks like driving a car, and the cockroach.

Points of Interest
------------------------
0:42 - My Surf Session
2:23 - Novilty Tricks
3:00 - Take Off Analysis and Instruction

Featured Videos
------------------------
iSurfTribe - Novilty Tricks -
Ben Gravy - Novilty Trick -
How to Rip - Small wave surfing -
Surf Simply - Angled Take Off -

Music
-----------------------
Rural Stride by Josh Kirsch Media Right Productions
Hear the Noise by John Deley and the 41 Players


Video edits made using VideoPad

Checkout mormon.org to improve your life



Learn to surf for beginners. Work on popup, stance, standing on the surfboard, longboard and shortboard. Angle the take off. Keep eyes up and paddle. Choose and select the right wave. Surf small, flat wave and generate power and speed. Pump to get speed. Maneuver and trick like bottom turns, top turns, floaters and cutbacks. Beach breaks. Work on duck dives and turtle rolls. Catch unbroken waves and stay out of the white water. Turn the board with carving and trimming. Drop in with confidence in the line up. Favorite surfers are Ben Gravy, Jamie Obrian, Kelly Slater.
x

Surfing Progression

Here is my commentary on my latest session. I felt like lots of things were coming together and that I did great that session.

Things I liked were staying low in my Gravy Crouch, keeping the back knee in, smooth popups, angled take-off, and keeping my eyes up on the popup.

Have fun and keep it real!


Surfing Raw Edit - Sept 3, 2018
======================



Music
======================
Island by Density and Time
Raw Space by Spazz Cardigan
Splashing Around by The Green Orbs


Videography
======================
SoloShot3


Editting
======================
SoloShotEdit



checkout mormon.org


Learn to surf for beginners. Work on popup, stance, standing on the surfboard, longboard and shortboard. Angle the take off. Keep eyes up and paddle. Choose and select the right wave. Surf small, flat wave and generate power and speed. Pump to get speed. Maneuver and trick like bottom turns, top turns, floaters and cutbacks. Beach breaks. Work on duck dives and turtle rolls. Catch unbroken waves and stay out of the white water. Turn the board with carving and trimming. Drop in with confidence in the line up. Favorite surfers are Ben Gravy, Jamie Obrian, Kelly Slater.

Catch The Perfect Wave

For more information:

Surfing positioning for take off on the wave

x

Learn How To Surf Fish & Improve your Catch Rate Along the Shore - Featuring Dr. Jim

Online:


Surf fishing citation winner Bill Hall and Dr. Jim give you tips on improving your catch rate along the shore. Learn how to read the water to find schools, the best time to fish and what equipment to take with you to surf. Learn about special rigs, the best bait and how to prepare it so the fish can't resist. You'll learn the type of line to use, how to set up your rig and all about shock leader. No matter if you're a seasoned surf fisherman or just want to learn this exciting aspect of sport fishing, this is the program is for you.

UNDERWATER FOOTAGE | Surf Fishing

Finally!! I’ve been wanting to do an underwater shot Perch Fishing on the surf. But unfortunately my camera broke.

Right after fishing, I was so excited and couldn’t wait to check the underwater footage at home. I was a bit concerned that my SD card might be corrupted because of the salt water that went inside the camera.
Thank goodness all the footage all came out fine😁. So here you go guys hope you’ll like it!!

—————————————

Gears

Underwater camera
ICONNTECHS:
Use this promo code “85JMTXEY” to get 10% discount on purchase

Visit my Amazon store



Wader:
Sandals:
Rod: 9’6” ODM RODS Frontier X
Reel: Van Staal VR50
Line:
Leader: 20lbs fluorocarbon
Camera used: Iphone 7
Gopro hero 4
Van Staal





More Than Fishing Social Media
website:
Instagram:
Facebook Page:
Twitter:

How to Hold your Surfboard while Walking out in the Ocean

When you're walking your surfboard out into the water you MUST hold the board by the nose and high on your hip. The reason you do this is because you will have the most CONTROL this way. When waves come and smash into you, you can lift your board up, turn your body sideways and take less of an impact rather than getting smashed and blown over and flustered. Follow this simple tip and you'll be a happier surfer everytime you go out. Remember to never hold your surfboard by the tail or backwards (having the fin side in the front) the reason this is not good is because the whitewash will grab the fins and spin the surfboard around and there is a higher possibility of your falling or getting hit in the face by the surfboard. Cool? cool... Now get out there and try it yourself.

Surf Completely - Learn how to Generate Speed on a Wave by Skateboarding

After catching a wave and standing up, learning how to generate your own speed is the most important skill in learning to surf. The success of every turn relies on having speed. Unfortunately, it can be tricky to learn how to pump, but practicing on land on a skateboard is a great way to learn. Having the right skateboard for the lesson is important. A longboard skateboard is key, and I prefer a Sector9 Sidewinder series skateboard. Check out the video for tips on how to improve your pumping by playing around on a skateboard.


music by Pitx

Surfing Bigger Waves

After last week's epic session, the waves this week were a bit too much for me this session. I take a pounding while trying my hand on some bigger waves.

Follow me on Twitter & Instagram @FifeNathaniel

Music
=====================
Race Car by Rondo Brothers

Footage
=====================
SoloShot3

Video Editting
=====================
VideoPad

Checkout mormon.org




Learn to surf for beginners. Work on popup, stance, standing on the surfboard, longboard and shortboard. Angle the take off. Keep eyes up and paddle. Choose and select the right wave. Surf small, flat wave and generate power and speed. Pump to get speed. Maneuver and trick like bottom turns, top turns, foaters and cutbacks. Beach breaks. Work on duck dives and turtle rolls. Catch unbroken waves and stay out of the white water. Turn the board with carving and trimming. Drop in with confidence in the line up. Favorite surfers are Ben Gravy, Jamie Obrian, Kelly Slater.

Shares

x

Check Also

x

Menu