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How To Build A Console Sink | This Old House

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How To Build A Console Sink | This Old House

Don designed a sink console for the powder room. Tommy shows him the best way to cut the oak top to hold the sink and faucet.

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Don works with Tommy in the shop to create a vanity for the powder room on the first floor. Tommy shows him the best way to cut the reclaimed oak top to hold the sink and faucet.

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WNET Washington.

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How To Build A Console Sink | This Old House

Live Edge Slab Table | Build It | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva and host Kevin O’Connor build a console table using a maple slab with a live edge on it.
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Time: 2 days

Cost: $300

Skill Level: Moderate

Tools List for Building a Live Edge Slab Table:
Track saw
Hammer
Chisel
Grinder
Palm sander
Clamps
Router
Drill

Shopping List:
Live edge slab
Hairpin legs
80-120 grit sandpaper
320 grit sandpaper
Wood glue
Scrap wood to use for rails and jig
Wood screws
Cheap paintbrush
Rags
Amber shellac
Tung Oil

Steps:
1. Before doing any work, determine the orientation of the table. Decide whether the live edge should face up or face down, see which face of the slab will look nicest on top, etc. For decorative tables, Tom likes having the live edge face up so it can be really celebrated. For more functional tables, like a dining room table, Tom likes the live edge down so there’s no gap between the flat surface of the table and the person sitting at the table. Mark the sides in the middle that will need to be cut.
2. Lay the slabs on a workbench with the sides you plan to cut facing the outside of the table. Cut straight edges on both sides of each slab with the track saw.
3. Put the slabs back in the correct orientation to check the size.
4. Remove the bark from the live edge using a hammer and chisel.
5. Once the bark is off, smooth out the edges with a grinder.
6. Sand the live edges with the palm sander. Do a few passes, starting with the rough sandpaper and work up to a smoother one.
7. Generously apply a coat of wood glue to both straight edges of the slabs and clamp the pieces together to dry.
8. Once the glue has dried, cut the rough edges on the short sides of the table with a track saw.
9. Sand the top of the table until the glue joint is perfectly blended.
10. Flip the table upside down and mark the desired location for the legs.
11. Cut two pieces of scrap wood to equal size and height and clamp them to the workbench around the tabletop.
12. Make a jig using the scrap wood to hold a router that’s wide enough to slide across the two rails.
13. Determine the appropriate depth to set the router by placing the jig over the four marks for the legs. Lower the router to the deepest point on the four marks.
14. Use the router to cut out four even sections based on the marks.
15. Drill holes in the table for the four legs. Then, screw the legs into the drilled holes with the wood screws.
16. Flip the table right side up on its legs. Apply a coat of amber shellac with the paintbrush to seal it. Let the shellac dry.
17. Lightly sand the table with the 320 grit sandpaper.
18. Apply three coats of tung oil to the table with a rag. Be sure to put the rag in a bucket of water when you’re finished. Let it dry overnight.
19. Apply three more coats of tung oil.

Resources:
Tom recommends locating a local lumber yard or mill to find live edge slabs. A quick Internet search should help you identify the one closest to you. Give them a call, talk about the project you’d like to do, and see what types of wood they have. Tom and Kevin used a slab of maple from The Rustic Wood Shop (

For a more modern look, Tom ordered hairpin metal legs to attach to the bottom of the table. He used the 48” I-Semble Hairpin Table Legs, available at Rockler Woodworking and Hardware (

To adhere the two boards together, Tom used wood glue, manufactured by Gorilla Glue (

About Build It:
This Old House general contractor Tom Silva, This Old House host Kevin O’Connor, and special guests including Jimmy DiResta, take you through step-by-step DIY projects in this popular video series. From end-tables to cutting boards to wine racks to chicken coops and more, learn how to build from the best pros in the game. Segments include mention of all tools and materials needed to get the job done.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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Live Edge Slab Table | Build It | Ask This Old House
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Black Pipe Bookshelf | Build It | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva creates a shelf using black plumbing pipe and butcher block. (See shopping list, tools, and steps below.)
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Shopping List for How to Black Pipe Bookshelf:
- Butcher block [
- Wipe-on polyurethane [
- 3/4” black pipes [
- Spray-on lacquer [
- 3/4” black pipe couplings [
- 3/4” black pipe end caps [
- 3/4” black pipe floor flange [

Tools for How to Black Pipe Bookshelf:
- Table saw [
- Hand plane [
- Portable drill press [
- Electric drill [
- Wrenches [

Steps for How to Black Pipe Bookshelf:
1. Use a table saw to rip the butcher block down the center.
2. Use the gauge block on the table saw to set your length and a crosscut guide to cut the butcher block to length.
3. Use a hand plane to ease out the edges.
4. Use a portable drill press to make holes in each corner of the butcher-block shelving pieces.
5. Sand down each piece of shelving.
6. For a finish, use a wipe-on polyurethane. Let it sit for about 3 hours, then put on a second coat.
7. Lightly sand down the black pipes to remove any residue.
8. Use spray-on lacquer to finish the pipes. Be sure to do this in an open area and use a mask.
9. With the pipes all dry, begin to assemble the shelf by placing the pipes through the holes on each side and tying them into the next piece using the couplings.
10. Snug up the connections with an open-end wrench.

About Build It:
This Old House general contractor Tom Silva, This Old House host Kevin O’Connor, and special guests including Jimmy DiResta, take you through step-by-step DIY projects in this popular video series. From end-tables to cutting boards to wine racks to chicken coops and more, learn how to build from the best pros in the game. Segments include mention of all tools and materials needed to get the job done.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
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For more on This Old House and Ask This Old House, visit us at:

Black Pipe Bookshelf | Build It | Ask This Old House

CUSTOM BAR BUILD

Plans for purchase at Here's a bar that I was commissioned to build over a few weekends. Some of the video clips got lost due to my garage being over 110 degrees, my DSLR was overheating and would stop filming without notice. This is my first of many build videos so please like and subscribe, I'm sure they'll get better. Thanks!........................And yes I used body hammers I could not find a claw hammer for the life of me.

Music by Joakim Karud
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How to Install a Console Sink

A style renowned for emphasizing symmetrical patterns and modern finishes, incorporating art deco pieces is a great way to make a statement in your home. Tom from Signature Hardware shows you how to install our art deco console sink to transform your bathroom into a luxurious retreat.

About Us: Signature Hardware is a family-owned retailer of premium bath fixtures, hardware, and home decor. Discover our wide selection of products at or call us at 1-866-855-2284.

How to Turn a Plain Sink into a Cedar Vanity | #DIYDare | This Old House

Turn an inexpensive wall-mount sink into a vanity using cedar, which doesn't mind getting a little wet. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.)
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Could you do better? It's your turn to make use of any scraps you've got lying around, supplemented, of course, by one or three trips to the home center, to build a project of your own. We're calling it the #DIYDARE. Check out this project and get inspired, then snap a photo and send it along to us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. (HASH)Tag, you're it.

Shopping List for How to Turn a Plain Sink into a Cedar Vanity:
- wall-mount sink
- 2x2 cedar
- 4x4 cedar
- 5/4 cedar decking
- 1/2-inch-diameter dowel
- tung oil
- cotton rag
- silicone

Tools for How to Turn a Plain Sink into a Cedar Vanity:
- tape measure
- pencil
- miter saw
- 18-gauge nailer and nails
- drill/driver and drill bits
- caulk gun
- wrench

Steps for How to Turn a Plain Sink into a Cedar Vanity:
1. Cut the parts.
2. Make the frame.
3. Build the shelf.
4. Notch the leg.
5. Join the legs to the frame.
6. Add the top frame.
7. Buff on tung oil.
8. Add the faucet

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
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Tumblr:

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How to Turn a Plain Sink into a Cedar Vanity | #DIYDare | This Old House
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How to Make a Rustic Industrial Black Pipe Bar Table

Here at Apple Valley Farm, we love using Black Pipe. Rustic Industrial project builds definitely make us smile!😁

Join us here as we assemble the legs and base on our Round Rustic Industrial Bar Table. It’s not that difficult, but the order of assemble does make a difference. Everything you see here came from our local Home Depot (of course), but you could also get it at Lowe's or any home center or local Hardware Store.

For more on this build, an exploded sketch of the project, or for a complete materials list, just ask. And for more like this, please Subscribe to our channel.

Oh yeah...don’t forget to Like and Comment if you enjoyed this! Thanks and have an amazing day!

How To Build A Porch Column Wrap | This Old House

Jeff and Kevin show how to customize decorative columns with a mahogany rail cap for the front porch.

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A decorative front porch includes flared columns and mahogany rails. Kevin meets Jeff at his shop where he fabricates the pieces. Then they install the system on site with carpenter Garrett Kirwin.

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WNET Washington.

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How To Build A Porch Column Wrap | This Old House

Naturstein Waschbecken (Natural stone Sink on a Oak console) The old Barn Part 1

We turn our 150 year old barn into a Bed and Breakfast. Here the creation of the first Guest room.
In this part specially the washing area.
The Console is made from maybe something about 300 - 400 jears old Oak wood. I made it from any Beams that i got from a Neighbour that torn his old House down.

In my upcomming videos you can see a few more projects in which the old beams are used an how the rest of the Room and the other rooms turned out.

Chris


Wir bauen unsere ca. 150 Jahre alte Scheune zur Ferienwohnung um. Hier sehr Ihr wie die Gästezimmer entstehen!

How to Make a Console Table

We show you how to make a hall table from recycled bits of wood in this DIY project.

Our local junkyard has a huge amount of recycled timber of all shapes and sizes. We choose the straight pieces and have them planed to the size we want. The jarrah we use is very old but extremely strong. We are going to retain as much character as we can in the timber. We want it to have a recycled look. But also add a bit of style in the design.

The construction method we use is the basis for constructing this kind of table. But as always we encourage to vary the size or style to suit your needs.

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Small Bathroom Makeovers: Pedestal Sink Installation (Step-by-Step)



Our courses

Small bathroom makeovers help transform an old bathroom, and today we install a pedestal sink.

The bathroom I'm working on today is over 120 years old. It needed a makeover badly.

But I wanted to get a pedestal sink and faucet that matched the style of the home. American Standard shipped me their Retrospect sink and Portsmouth faucet. It fits the style of the bathroom.

The first thing to do with a pedestal sink is to check for studs in the wall. Pedestal sinks should be attached to studs or framing using lag screws. If you don't have either in the location where the sink will go you'll have to add wood blocking behind the drywall.

This video doesn't tackle wood blocking but basically you'll add a 2x6 or 2x8 in the wall using decking screws. Then you can drywall over the blocking and attach the sink to it.

Watch the video to see how to install the sink and faucet.



Btw, this is my CYA, I'm not responsible for any water leaks...it's up to you to inspect your work and make sure it's leakproof. This video is meant to be for entertainment purposes.

How to Build a Bar | This Old House

Senior technical editor Mark Powers builds a bar for entertaining. (See below for a shopping list and tools.)
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Shopping List for How to Build a Bar:
- Lauan to sheathe the outside of the bar. Get one-and-a-half 4-by-8-foot sheets.
- 1/2-inch birch-veneer plywood, to sheathe the interior. Get one-and-a-half 4-by-8 sheets.
- 3/4-inch utility-grade plywood, for the base of the bar. Get one 4-by-8 sheet.
- 1x4 common-pine boards, to be sandwiched between the sheathing. Get eight 8-footers.
- 1x4 clear-pine boards for the stiles and rails. Get seven 8-footers.
- 1x8 clear-pine board, for the bottom rail. Get one 8-footer.
- 1x10 clear-pine boards, for the shelves. Get two 6-footers.
- 1x2 for the capping and supports. Get one 6-foot common-pine board and one 8-foot clear-pine board.
- 1x1 for the shelf cleats. Get two 8-foot lengths.
- Panel or base cap molding, to trim the inside edges of the stiles and rails. Get six 6-foot pieces.
- 1x12 oak to finish the bar top.] Get one 10-foot board.
- 1x2 oak for the trim. Get one 12-foot board.
- Oak bar-rail molding. Get one 12-foot length.
- Foot rail, brackets, and caps] (optional)
- 1-inch nails
- 1 1/4-inch nails
- 5/8-inch brad nails
- 1 1/4-inch screws
- 3-inch screws
- Construction adhesive
- Wood glue

Tools for How to Build a Bar:
- Circular saw
- Miter saw
- Drill/driver fitted with a combination drill bit
- Pneumatic nail gun
- Small hand saw

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

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How to Build a Bar | This Old House
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IKEA HACK - The Shiplap-style Storage Bench

TOOLS LIST (Amazon links):
-Miter Saw:
-Drill and Impact Driver:
-Tape Measure:
-Safety Goggles:
-Ear Protection:
-Mask:

MATERIALS LIST (Amazon links):
Cabinet Screws:
Trim Head Screws:
Sanding Blocks:
Spackling:
Stain:
Poly:
Wood Conditioner:
(partial list, other items found at Ikea and hardware stores)
[affiliate]

OUR SOCIAL MEDIA:
-Instagram:
-Facebook:
-Pinterest:
-Snapchat: TheRehabLife

If you enjoyed this video, please help us by LIKING and SHARING!
Easy DIY tutorial for turning an Ikea shelving unit into a shiplap storage bench!

Make a Bar With a Pipe Base

I'M MAKING A RUSTIC BUT MODERN STYLE BAR HERE.IT'S MORE LIKE A DRINKING BAR COUNTER(WALK UP BAR). A FEW COOL TRICKS TO MAKE THE WOOD LOOK OLD AND RECLAIMED. ENJOY!

How to Build Wood Tabletop

Follow Ana on Instagram:

Ana White's tips and tricks on building a wood tabletop out of off the shelf wood.

See also how to build a table base video:
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DIY Modern Geometric Table Legs

Check out how I made these simple geometric (trapezoid) table legs for my funky coffee table top I recently built using reclaimed wood left over from our house renovation. They're really simple to build, they're sturdy, and they look awesome!

DIY $10 Library Table Makeover:


DIY Table Top Rescue:


DIY Ardex Concrete Coffee Table:


DIY Herringbone Reclaimed Wood Coffee Table:


$4 Target Coffee Table Transformation:


DIY Bass Drum Coffee Table:


If you liked this video, a thumbs up would be awesome!

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Spaghetti Wires | Home Inspection Nightmares | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House host Kevin O’Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, landscape designer Jenn Nawada, and master electrician Heath Eastman share more home inspection nightmares

#ThisOldHouse #AskTOH
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Steps:
1. Heath shows a junction box with too many splices inside of it.
2. Jenn shows a hose spigot that has several different hose connections for a “built in” irrigation system.
3. Tom shows a slate roof that was repaired with duct tape.
4. Richard shares a bathtub that’s floor was completely covered in duct tape to prevent a leak.

Resources:
Expert assistance with this segment was provided by the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) (

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
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Keywords: Ask This Old House, Home Inspection Nightmares, Kevin O'Connor, Tom Silva, Richard Trethewey, Jenn Nawada, Heath Eastman, electrical, plumbing, landscaping, brick, walkway

Watch the full episode:


Spaghetti Wires | Home Inspection Nightmares | Ask This Old House

How To Install A Wall Mounted Toilet | This Old House

Richard assists hanging a wall mounted toilet during the rough plumbing stage.

#ThisOldHouse #AskTOH
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Wall mounted toilets are becoming more popular. Richard explains the advantages and works with plumber Josh Jordan to install the tank inside the wall.

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WNET Washington.

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How To Install A Wall Mounted Toilet | This Old House

DIY Pipe Coffee Table

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This rustic modern coffee table is made from 2x8s, angle irons, and black iron pipe. I used angle irons to bind the pieces of 2x8 together and then made a legs for the table out of ¾” diameter plumbers pipe. It is a sturdy table that can be made in a variety of sizes and heights.

Follow us on Instagram to see what we're working on next!
Ben:
Jessie:

How To Screen A Porch | This Old House

Tommy Silva and Jeff Sweenor make fiberglass screens the old fashioned way, with wooden stops and staples.

#ThisOldHouse #AskTOH
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About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WNET Washington.

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How To Screen A Porch | This Old House

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