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How To Build A Console Sink | This Old House

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The $20 Rustic Bathroom Cabinet - Easy DIY Project

TOOLS LIST (Amazon links):
-Miter Saw:
-Drill and Impact Driver:
-Tape Measure:
-Safety Goggles:
-Ear Protection:
-Mask:

MATERIALS LIST (Amazon links):
-1/2 Galvanized Pipe (18):
-1/2 Galvanized Floor Flange:
-1/2 Galvanized Elbow:
-1/2 Galvanized Close Nipple:
-2 Finish Nails:
-1 Finish Nails:
-1/2 Screws:
-Wood Glue:
-Sanding Block:
-Stain:
-Polyurethane:

OUR SOCIAL MEDIA:
-Instagram:
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-Snapchat: TheRehabLife

ALL OF OUR LUMBER IS PURCHASED AT MENARDS, A MIDWEST HARDWARE CHAIN. FOR THESE VIDEOS, WE ARE GENERALLY USING STANDARD PINE BOARDS. YOUR PRICES WILL VARY DEPENDING ON WHERE YOU SHOP AND THE TYPE OF WOOD YOU SELECT.
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DIY Farmhouse Dining Table w/ Epoxy Inlays Using Reclaimed Barnwood

This week I show you how to build a DIY farmhouse dining table using reclaimed barn wood lumber, featuring epoxy inlays. My friends asked me to build them a Parsons style table, and I came up with the idea to use reclaimed lumber, and pour pigmented epoxy into the voids. Let me know what you think about this DIY farmhouse table. Thanks!

Support on Patreon:

Check out the sponsor of this week’s video: Vintage Reclaimed Lumber in Oklahoma City.
VRL website:
Phone: (405) 702-0001
Use code *JONNY10* for 10% off your order. They’ll ship it to you!

**SUPPORT JONNY BUILDS**

Edit you browser bookmark URL from amazon dot com to this:
Copy and paste the link into your bookmark for Amazon. Or create a new bookmark and edit the URL. I’ll receive some loose commission change which will help support this channel. Send of screenshot of your edited bookmark URL to jonnybuildsstuff@gmail.com along with your mailing address, and I’ll send you some stickers. Thanks!

**FOLLOW**
* Instagram -
*Website:
* Subscribe -
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** Things I used **

East Coast 1:1 Epoxy:
Pigments -
Blue:
Green:
Pearl:
Mixing Cups:
Sand Paper -
120:
600:
1200:
2000:
Aluminum Tape:
Tape Measure:
Pushblock:
Block Plane:
My Camera -
My Main Lens -


Music

Ampletunes
1. Gold Rush

Epidemic Sound
1. The Summer
2. I’m Thinking About
3. Looking for You
4. Blush

#reclaimedwood #barnwood #epoxy #diningtable
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How to Build a Bar | This Old House

Senior technical editor Mark Powers builds a bar for entertaining. (See below for a shopping list and tools.)
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Shopping List for How to Build a Bar:
- Lauan to sheathe the outside of the bar. Get one-and-a-half 4-by-8-foot sheets.
- 1/2-inch birch-veneer plywood, to sheathe the interior. Get one-and-a-half 4-by-8 sheets.
- 3/4-inch utility-grade plywood, for the base of the bar. Get one 4-by-8 sheet.
- 1x4 common-pine boards, to be sandwiched between the sheathing. Get eight 8-footers.
- 1x4 clear-pine boards for the stiles and rails. Get seven 8-footers.
- 1x8 clear-pine board, for the bottom rail. Get one 8-footer.
- 1x10 clear-pine boards, for the shelves. Get two 6-footers.
- 1x2 for the capping and supports. Get one 6-foot common-pine board and one 8-foot clear-pine board.
- 1x1 for the shelf cleats. Get two 8-foot lengths.
- Panel or base cap molding, to trim the inside edges of the stiles and rails. Get six 6-foot pieces.
- 1x12 oak to finish the bar top.] Get one 10-foot board.
- 1x2 oak for the trim. Get one 12-foot board.
- Oak bar-rail molding. Get one 12-foot length.
- Foot rail, brackets, and caps] (optional)
- 1-inch nails
- 1 1/4-inch nails
- 5/8-inch brad nails
- 1 1/4-inch screws
- 3-inch screws
- Construction adhesive
- Wood glue

Tools for How to Build a Bar:
- Circular saw
- Miter saw
- Drill/driver fitted with a combination drill bit
- Pneumatic nail gun
- Small hand saw

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

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How to Build a Bar | This Old House
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How to Turn a Plain Sink into a Cedar Vanity | #DIYDare | This Old House

Turn an inexpensive wall-mount sink into a vanity using cedar, which doesn't mind getting a little wet. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.)
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Could you do better? It's your turn to make use of any scraps you've got lying around, supplemented, of course, by one or three trips to the home center, to build a project of your own. We're calling it the #DIYDARE. Check out this project and get inspired, then snap a photo and send it along to us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. (HASH)Tag, you're it.

Shopping List for How to Turn a Plain Sink into a Cedar Vanity:
- wall-mount sink
- 2x2 cedar
- 4x4 cedar
- 5/4 cedar decking
- 1/2-inch-diameter dowel
- tung oil
- cotton rag
- silicone

Tools for How to Turn a Plain Sink into a Cedar Vanity:
- tape measure
- pencil
- miter saw
- 18-gauge nailer and nails
- drill/driver and drill bits
- caulk gun
- wrench

Steps for How to Turn a Plain Sink into a Cedar Vanity:
1. Cut the parts.
2. Make the frame.
3. Build the shelf.
4. Notch the leg.
5. Join the legs to the frame.
6. Add the top frame.
7. Buff on tung oil.
8. Add the faucet

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

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How to Turn a Plain Sink into a Cedar Vanity | #DIYDare | This Old House
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How to Make a Simple Single Sink Bathroom Vanity (The Legs)

This is video two in the series of How to Make a Single Sink Bathroom Vanity.

Normally I would not devote a whole video to making legs for a vanity, but I had some questions on facebook. So I decided to go ahead and show the steps I took to make the legs.

Please like, comment and share. Also make sure to hit that subscribe button to ensure you don't miss any of these videos.

Thanks for watching.

How to Make a Rustic Industrial Black Pipe Bar Table

Here at Apple Valley Farm, we love using Black Pipe. Rustic Industrial project builds definitely make us smile!????

Join us here as we assemble the legs and base on our Round Rustic Industrial Bar Table. It’s not that difficult, but the order of assemble does make a difference. Everything you see here came from our local Home Depot (of course), but you could also get it at Lowe's or any home center or local Hardware Store.

For more on this build, an exploded sketch of the project, or for a complete materials list, just ask. And for more like this, please Subscribe to our channel.

Oh yeah...don’t forget to Like and Comment if you enjoyed this! Thanks and have an amazing day!

This Old House | Designing Their Dream Home (S40 E9) | FULL EPISODE

Dana and Don show Kevin interior design choices at their architecture studio. Richard demonstrates how a heat pump works. Mark watches as stone veneer is applied at the Idea House. The plumber installs a wall hung toilet tank inside the wall. Don builds his powder room vanity with Tom.

#ThisOldHouse #AskTOH
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Kevin opens the show in Providence, RI to meet the homeowners at their architecture office. Donald and Dana drew the plans for their renovation and they also worked out the design decisions, as they often do with their clients. Back at the house, Richard meets up with the plumber who is about to install a toilet tank. Wall hung toilets, which are commonly found in Europe, are the new trend. At the Idea House in Narragansett, Mark McCullough watches as a stone veneer goes around the fireplace in the living room. Using a cyclical mock up, Richard explains how heat pumps work. Compression makes the air hotter and expansion makes the air colder. Back in Rhode Island, Tommy works with Donald to build a sink console for the powder room. They meet in Jeff’s shop where Donald shows Tommy the steel frame he designed and had welded. For the top, they cut reclaimed oak and form an arc where the sink will sit. They cut out the holes for the sink drain and faucet and place the fixtures in to see how it all comes together.

Join This Old House INSIDER to stream 41 years of This Old House and 18 years of Ask This Old House, access live streaming events with our experts, and enjoy exclusive deals and discounts: bit.ly/TOHInsider

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About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

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This Old House | Designing Their Dream Home (S40 E9) | FULL EPISODE

How To Build An Indoor Dog Kennel (DIY)

This is how I built a multi purpose dog kennel that doubles as a console table. This kennel not only looks great but doubles as a media table or sofa table. Perfect for housing your dogs or puppies while you are away from home. This makes a great diy project and an awesome doggie den. This video can be used for DIY kennel ideas. Please give me a thumbs up and subscribe if you like what I do. This post contains affiliate links.

Sign up for our email list to be notified about new content, products, contests and more!

Help support what we do by becoming a Patron! If you get value out of what we are doing, we would appreciate it if you would consider giving back to us. Starting at just $1 per month, you could help us so much!

Support us by checking out our merchandise:

Decorate your home with farmhouse and rustic decor to match this great furniture build:

Tools and supplies I recommend:

Kreg R3 Pocket Hole Jig

Kreg K5 Pocket Hole Jig

Kreg 2 1/2 Pocket Hole Screws

Minwax Pre-Stain Conditioner

Minwax Dark Walnut Stain

Irwin 36 Clamps

Counter Sink Drill Bits

Titebond III Wood Glue

General Finishes Clear Coat

Diablo Sandnet 120 Grit Sandpaper

For a list of tools I use visit

Check out my blog:

Follow us on Instagram

I'm using TubeBuddy to help grow my Channel. If you have a channel I think it can help you too! Check it out here (affiliate link)



#dogkennel #diykennel #indoordogkennel

How To Build A Porch Column Wrap | This Old House

Jeff and Kevin show how to customize decorative columns with a mahogany rail cap for the front porch.

#ThisOldHouse #AskTOH
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A decorative front porch includes flared columns and mahogany rails. Kevin meets Jeff at his shop where he fabricates the pieces. Then they install the system on site with carpenter Garrett Kirwin.

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WNET Washington.

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How To Build A Porch Column Wrap | This Old House

How to install a wall mount sink and plumb it too!

Learn how to replace a bulky vanity with a space-saving wall mount sink or wash basin. I'll also touch on the wall mount sink plumbing process. I am not a professional builder or plumber, but I was able to hang this small wall mount sink with a little help from my three-year-old. This is an easy/intermediate project that can be completed in one to two weekends. Check out the wall mount sink blog post at theunprofessional.com for a list of products used in this project.

Wall mount sinks or wash basins are great for small spaces, and are easier to install that one might think. Even a DIY beginner can can hang a wall mount sink with a few tools and a little preperation.

I hope you enjoy this how-to hang a wall mount sink tutorial and learn a thing or two about installing a wall mount sink or wash basin. Leave me a comment and subscribe for more videos of The Unprofessional. Thanks for watching!

Lara
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Naturstein Waschbecken (Natural stone Sink on a Oak console) The old Barn Part 1

We turn our 150 year old barn into a Bed and Breakfast. Here the creation of the first Guest room.
In this part specially the washing area.
The Console is made from maybe something about 300 - 400 jears old Oak wood. I made it from any Beams that i got from a Neighbour that torn his old House down.

In my upcomming videos you can see a few more projects in which the old beams are used an how the rest of the Room and the other rooms turned out.

Chris


Wir bauen unsere ca. 150 Jahre alte Scheune zur Ferienwohnung um. Hier sehr Ihr wie die Gästezimmer entstehen!

This Old House | Net Zero Comes Together (S40 E13) | FULL EPISODE

The Net Zero house is complete. Kevin and Tom discuss challenges with Jeff. Don gives Kevin a tour of the yard and barn. Dana shows Tom the upstairs. He checks out the main floor with Don. Richard reviews mechanicals. All gather in the transformed kitchen at the end.

#ThisOldHouse #AskTOH
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Today is the day the net zero house gets turned over to the Powers family. Kevin and Tommy pick up builder Jeff at the Idea House and drive to Jamestown. Jeff’s challenges were to make the house efficient but also make it fit in with the neighborhood. Donald meets them outside and shows them the exterior transformation. The coastal landscape already looks mature and is divided into many separate “rooms” for entertainment and projects. They see the new post and beam barn with a garage, workshop, guest suite, and the location of the new solar panels. Inside the house, Tommy goes upstairs to meet Dana who shows him the boys’ rooms, their bathroom, and the new master suite. Kevin helps Jeff put up a mirror in a bathroom. Tommy and Don comment how the white oak shiplap siding and flooring, bookcase and hand rails give the living room a clean simple look. Kevin meets Richard at the back of the barn where it’s command central for the net zero house. The solar panels will provide enough electricity for the house. The heat recovery units quietly pump into five zones so that the house can receive both warm and cool air where needed as well as provide hot water at any time. Kevin meets Dana in the mudroom where there’s plenty of storage. In the powder room, they check out the sink console that Don built with Tommy. The kitchen has seen the biggest transformation with beautiful cabinets, appliances, tile, ceiling and floors, and counters. The gang joins them and they declare the net zero house a success.

Join This Old House INSIDER to stream 41 years of This Old House and 18 years of Ask This Old House, access live streaming events with our experts, and enjoy exclusive deals and discounts: bit.ly/TOHInsider

Plus, download our app for streaming full episodes to your connected TV, phone or tablet: bit.ly/TOHApp

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

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This Old House | Net Zero Comes Together (S40 E13) | FULL EPISODE

How to Replace a Pedestal Sink | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey helps a homeowner in Delaware replace his cracked pedestal sink. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.)
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Shopping List for How to Replace a Pedestal Sink:
- Pedestal sink kit
- Bath faucet
- Braided hose connectors

Tools for How to Replace a Pedestal Sink:
- Open-end wrench
- Socket set
- Pliers
- Caulk gun

Steps for How to Replace a Pedestal Sink:
1. Turn off the water supply to the sink.
2. Use an open-end wrench to loosen the nuts on the hot/cold water connections.
3. Use pliers to break the drainage connection.
4. Loosen lag screws holding the sink onto the wall using a socket set.
5. Release the caulking attaching the sink to the wall using a utility knife.
6. Lift the sink off the pedestal and remove the pedestal.
7. On the new sink, attach the new spout by surrounding its base with plumber’s putty and inserting it into the center hole. Tighten up the connection using an open-end wrench.
8. Repeat the same steps for both the hot- and cold-water handles.
9. Attach braided hoses to handles using an open-end wrench; then do the same to attach the hoses to the spout piping.
10. Insert the pivot rod into the drainage pipe.
11. Adjust the clevis pin’s connecting bar to the right height and attach it to the pivot rod.
12. Place entire assembly on the bathroom floor where previous pedestal sink stood.
13. Line up drainage pipe to fit into wall thread. Hand-tighten it. Then, use the open-end wrench to snug it up.
14. Insert new lag bolts through sink fixture and into the wall. Tighten with socket set.
15. Using open-end wrench to connect braided hoses to hot/cold lines.
16. Put a layer of caulking along the back of the sink for added connection to the wall.
17. Turn the water supply back on.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
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How to Replace a Pedestal Sink | Ask This Old House

DIY Reclaimed Lumber Bath Vanity

In this video, I make a bath vanity using reclaimed wood. I finish it with a concrete top and you can check out that video by following the link.


patreon.com/sgtdonovan

DIY! Turning A Rock Into A Beautiful Sink!

I have wanted to do this for a very long time! I'm extremely excited about the outcome! This will be installed in my master bathroom that im working on as we speak!! Subscribe and stay tuned for future videos!

Here is what you would need to do this your self!
7 Masonry blade i used;

4 thick blade i used to smooth out;


2 Core hole drill for pop up valve;


To polish the sink smooth i used two polishing pads;

50 Grit Polishing pad;


200 Grit Polishing pad;


This is the exact pop-up drain i got;


For sealing the stone, any tile sealer will work for this!
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How to Make a Console Table

We show you how to make a hall table from recycled bits of wood in this DIY project.

Our local junkyard has a huge amount of recycled timber of all shapes and sizes. We choose the straight pieces and have them planed to the size we want. The jarrah we use is very old but extremely strong. We are going to retain as much character as we can in the timber. We want it to have a recycled look. But also add a bit of style in the design.

The construction method we use is the basis for constructing this kind of table. But as always we encourage to vary the size or style to suit your needs.

Small Bathroom Makeovers: Pedestal Sink Installation (Step-by-Step)



Our courses

Small bathroom makeovers help transform an old bathroom, and today we install a pedestal sink.

The bathroom I'm working on today is over 120 years old. It needed a makeover badly.

But I wanted to get a pedestal sink and faucet that matched the style of the home. American Standard shipped me their Retrospect sink and Portsmouth faucet. It fits the style of the bathroom.

The first thing to do with a pedestal sink is to check for studs in the wall. Pedestal sinks should be attached to studs or framing using lag screws. If you don't have either in the location where the sink will go you'll have to add wood blocking behind the drywall.

This video doesn't tackle wood blocking but basically you'll add a 2x6 or 2x8 in the wall using decking screws. Then you can drywall over the blocking and attach the sink to it.

Watch the video to see how to install the sink and faucet.



Btw, this is my CYA, I'm not responsible for any water leaks...it's up to you to inspect your work and make sure it's leakproof. This video is meant to be for entertainment purposes.

How to Install a Console Sink

A style renowned for emphasizing symmetrical patterns and modern finishes, incorporating art deco pieces is a great way to make a statement in your home. Tom from Signature Hardware shows you how to install our art deco console sink to transform your bathroom into a luxurious retreat.

About Us: Signature Hardware is a family-owned retailer of premium bath fixtures, hardware, and home decor. Discover our wide selection of products at or call us at 1-866-855-2284.

Live Edge Slab Table | Build It | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House general contractor Tom Silva and host Kevin O’Connor build a console table using a maple slab with a live edge on it.
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Time: 2 days

Cost: $300

Skill Level: Moderate

Tools List for Building a Live Edge Slab Table:
Track saw
Hammer
Chisel
Grinder
Palm sander
Clamps
Router
Drill

Shopping List:
Live edge slab
Hairpin legs
80-120 grit sandpaper
320 grit sandpaper
Wood glue
Scrap wood to use for rails and jig
Wood screws
Cheap paintbrush
Rags
Amber shellac
Tung Oil

Steps:
1. Before doing any work, determine the orientation of the table. Decide whether the live edge should face up or face down, see which face of the slab will look nicest on top, etc. For decorative tables, Tom likes having the live edge face up so it can be really celebrated. For more functional tables, like a dining room table, Tom likes the live edge down so there’s no gap between the flat surface of the table and the person sitting at the table. Mark the sides in the middle that will need to be cut.
2. Lay the slabs on a workbench with the sides you plan to cut facing the outside of the table. Cut straight edges on both sides of each slab with the track saw.
3. Put the slabs back in the correct orientation to check the size.
4. Remove the bark from the live edge using a hammer and chisel.
5. Once the bark is off, smooth out the edges with a grinder.
6. Sand the live edges with the palm sander. Do a few passes, starting with the rough sandpaper and work up to a smoother one.
7. Generously apply a coat of wood glue to both straight edges of the slabs and clamp the pieces together to dry.
8. Once the glue has dried, cut the rough edges on the short sides of the table with a track saw.
9. Sand the top of the table until the glue joint is perfectly blended.
10. Flip the table upside down and mark the desired location for the legs.
11. Cut two pieces of scrap wood to equal size and height and clamp them to the workbench around the tabletop.
12. Make a jig using the scrap wood to hold a router that’s wide enough to slide across the two rails.
13. Determine the appropriate depth to set the router by placing the jig over the four marks for the legs. Lower the router to the deepest point on the four marks.
14. Use the router to cut out four even sections based on the marks.
15. Drill holes in the table for the four legs. Then, screw the legs into the drilled holes with the wood screws.
16. Flip the table right side up on its legs. Apply a coat of amber shellac with the paintbrush to seal it. Let the shellac dry.
17. Lightly sand the table with the 320 grit sandpaper.
18. Apply three coats of tung oil to the table with a rag. Be sure to put the rag in a bucket of water when you’re finished. Let it dry overnight.
19. Apply three more coats of tung oil.

Resources:
Tom recommends locating a local lumber yard or mill to find live edge slabs. A quick Internet search should help you identify the one closest to you. Give them a call, talk about the project you’d like to do, and see what types of wood they have. Tom and Kevin used a slab of maple from The Rustic Wood Shop (

For a more modern look, Tom ordered hairpin metal legs to attach to the bottom of the table. He used the 48” I-Semble Hairpin Table Legs, available at Rockler Woodworking and Hardware (

To adhere the two boards together, Tom used wood glue, manufactured by Gorilla Glue (

About Build It:
This Old House general contractor Tom Silva, This Old House host Kevin O’Connor, and special guests including Jimmy DiResta, take you through step-by-step DIY projects in this popular video series. From end-tables to cutting boards to wine racks to chicken coops and more, learn how to build from the best pros in the game. Segments include mention of all tools and materials needed to get the job done.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
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Twitter:

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Tumblr:

For more on This Old House and Ask This Old House, visit us at:

Live Edge Slab Table | Build It | Ask This Old House

How To Build A Console Sink | This Old House

Don designed a sink console for the powder room. Tommy shows him the best way to cut the oak top to hold the sink and faucet.

#ThisOldHouse #AskTOH
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Don works with Tommy in the shop to create a vanity for the powder room on the first floor. Tommy shows him the best way to cut the reclaimed oak top to hold the sink and faucet.

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WNET Washington.

Follow This Old House and Ask This Old House:
Facebook:
Twitter:

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Tumblr:

How To Build A Console Sink | This Old House

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