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How to Clear a Clogged Sink Drain - This Old House

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How to Clear a Clogged Sink Drain | This Old House

Plumbing and heating contractor Richard Trethewey unclogs a stubborn sink drain. (See below for a shopping list and tools.)
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Shopping List for How to Clear a Clogged Sink Drain:
- Full-size brass T-fitting with no baffle, used to replace old plastic T-fitting
- Pan, used to catch water drained from the trap[BR][BR]
- Paper towels, for lining the sink cabinet floor to detect leaks

Tools for How to Clear a Clogged Sink Drain:
- Pliers, used to loosen and tighten plumbing connections

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

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How to Clear a Clogged Sink Drain | This Old House

New Solutions to Unclog Sinks | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey discusses some innovations that can make clearing a clogged sink easier
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Tools List for Unclogging Sinks:
Plunger
Drain snake

Shopping List:
Rags
Magnetic pop up drain assembly

Steps:
1. There are a couple different ways to unclog a sink and to prevent clogged sinks in the first place.
2. The first method Richard explains includes using a plunger at the base of the sink. Be careful when using this method to block the overflow opening at the front of the sink with a rag or something. Otherwise, you’ll get covered in clogged sink water when the force of the plunger pushes everything up through the overflow.
3. Another method includes using a drain snake. Push the drain snake down the snake as far as possible, then spin it around to catch whatever is clogging the sink. Pull the snake out and dispose of the clog. The most effective snakes will require removing the pop up drain assembly, which can be a hassle, so they also make snakes that can fit underneath the pop up.
4. Another solution to the pop up drain issue is to install a magnetic pop up drain assembly. This makes it significantly easier to remove the pop up in case of a clog, but it also eliminates the pop up lever that causes many clogs in the first place.
5. If the clog is happening further down the drain, they’ve also created a new type of P-trap with a cleanout on the end to make clearing the clog easier, and then you don’t have to touch the pop up assembly.

Resources:
Richard demonstrated a variety of pop ups and drain clearing devices that can all be found at home centers and plumbing supply houses.

The magnetic pop up drain is called the ClogFree No Clog Pop-Up Drain Kit, which is manufactured by PF Waterworks (

The P-trap with the clean out is the Go Green Drain system, which can be found through IdeaBuyer (

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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New Solutions to Unclog Sinks | Ask This Old House
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How to Snake a Clogged Drain | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey shows how to clear a stopped bathtub or shower drain.
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Cost: $15

Skill Level: Beginner

Tools List for Snaking a Drain:
Drum Auger

Steps:
1. Richard recommends avoiding drain cleaning chemicals when possible.
2. He instead suggests using a drum auger, also called a snake, for clearing a stoppage.
3. For a shower, remove the strainer and run the snake down the drain until the stoppage clears.
4. In a bathtub, remove the overflow and run the snake through that opening.

Resources:
Drum augers can be found at a home center or plumbing supply store.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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How to Snake a Clogged Drain | Ask This Old House

How to Clear a Clogged Bathtub Drain | This Old House

This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey shows how to fix a slow draining tub. (See below for tools.)
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Tools For Clearing a Clogged Bathtub Drain:
- screwdriver [
- pliers [
- drain snake [ used to clear the clog
- adjustable wrench [

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

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How to Clear a Clogged Bathtub Drain | This Old House
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How to Unclog a Bathroom Sink | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey reveals the best ways to unclog a backed-up bathroom sink. (See below for a shopping list, tools, and steps.)
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Shopping List for How to Unclog a Bathroom Sink:
- Hair snare
- Drain snake

Tools List for How to Unclog a Bathroom Sink:
- Open-faced wrench
- Bucket (to catch any excess water)

Steps for How to Unclog a Bathroom Sink:
1. First, check the pop-up assembly to make sure it's rising up enough at the drain line of the sink.
2. If that's not the problem, disassemble the pop-up assembly by loosening the nut on the main drainage pipe with an open-faced wrench and remove it. Be sure to use a bucket underneath to catch any excess water.
3. Any gunk may be connected to the pop-up that's released, or excess gunk in the drain can be scraped out by hand.
4. If there's a stoppage further down the drain, use the hair snare and fish it down the drain to attempt to loosen the obstruction.
5. The last resort may be a drain snake. Fish the apparatus down through the pipes and through the p-trap to attempt to loosen obstruction.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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How to Unclog a Bathroom Sink | Ask This Old House

How to Clear a Clogged Plumbing Vent | This Old House

This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey employs his detective skills to find and clear a stubborn clog. (See below for tools.)
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Tools for Clearing a Clogged Plumbing Vent
- inspection camera [ can be rented for $75 to $100 a day
- electrician's probe [
- garden hose [

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

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How to Clear a Clogged Plumbing Vent | This Old House
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How To unblock a kitchen sink drain

blocked up drain .how to properly clear a drain

How to Fix a Slow Draining or Clogged Sink - ProMaster Home Repair

All of us can relate to that frustrating experience of a slow draining or clogged sink. In this article and video, Don Kennedy of ProMaster will show you how to fix a clogged or slow draining sink.

Read Full Article at:

As always, call ProMaster at (513) 724-0539 or check out our website at if you need help with any of your home repair or handyman needs.

ProMaster is a home repair company based in Cincinnati, Ohio. ProMaster takes pride in being on-time and family-friendly. All of our employees are background checked and drug tested to ensure that you and your family are safe and comfortable with the craftsman completing your project. ProMaster is also the only company in the area that gives you a specific time for your appointment, not a two hour window like Time Warner.

How to Repair a Kitchen Sink Drain Trap | This Old House

This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey re-plumbs a poorly draining sink. (See below for a shopping list and tools.)
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Shopping List for How to Repair a Kitchen Sink Drain Trap:
- PVC pipe and assorted fittings
- PVC primer and cement
- stainless-steel hose clamps

Tools for How to Repair a Kitchen Sink Drain Trap:
- PVC tubing cutter
- screwdriver

About This Old House TV:
This Old House is the No. 1 multimedia home enthusiast brand, offering trusted information and expert advice through award-winning television, a highly regarded magazine, and an information-driven website. This Old House and Ask This Old House are produced by This Old House Ventures, LLC and are presented on PBS by WETA Washington, DC.

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How to Repair a Kitchen Sink Drain Trap | This Old House

How to Work a Snake for a Clog in a Sink : Home Sweet Home Repair

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Working a snake for a clog in a sink is a process that will vary depending on the configuration of the pipes in question. Work a snake for a clog in a sink with help from the president and owner of Source Development Inc. in this free video clip.

Expert: Nicholas Iarocci
Filmmaker: Alan Mack

Series Description: Not all plumbing issues or appliance installations require the expensive help of a local professional. Get tips on plumbing with help from the president and owner of Source Development Inc. in this free video series.
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How to Diagnose Plumbing Drain Problems | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey tracks down the source of a clogged drain using some high tech equipment.
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Time: 1-2 hours

Cost: $10,000 in tools

Skill Level: Advanced

Tools List:
- Gloves [
- Drain Camera [
- Drain Locator Tool [

Steps:
1. Use a drain camera to look for possible obstructions in the main drain line of the house. Ensure the distance meter is reset before entering the drain to give an accurate measurement of where in the pipe a clog may be located.
2. Use a line locator to confirm the location of the camera under the floor.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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How to Diagnose Plumbing Drain Problems | Ask This Old House

Easy to Fix a Clogged Sink - No Tools Needed

Donations appreciated: PayPal.me/TomahawkDIY or Venmo @TomahawkDIY

It's easy to fix a sink that is clogged and won't drain or drains too slowly. Here's how.

If you need to buy new parts, find them on Amazon:

#087
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How to Diagnose a Gurgling Sink | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey shows host Kevin O’Connor the proper way to ventilate a sink.
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Cost: $20 and Up

Skill Level: Moderate

Tools List for Diagnosing a Gurgling Sink:
Pipe wrench

Shopping List:
PVC pipes

Steps:
1. If a sink is gurgling after the toilet flushes, there’s probably a good chance the drain is not ventilated properly.
2. Replace whatever pipe fitting is at the drain past the P trap with a T fitting. Run pipe from the bottom of the T to the main drain line and then run pipe from the top of the T to the vent system of the house. This may require running a pipe to the roof if there isn’t a vent system.
3. In some areas, code may permit a retrofitted mechanical vent that can be placed on a pipe on top of the T instead of running it to the roof or vent system.

Resources:
Richard demonstrated a PVC P-trap with a mechanical vent that can be used where conventional venting is not an option. These and the materials required to install them can be found at home centers and plumbing supply stores.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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How to Diagnose a Gurgling Sink | Ask This Old House

How to unclog a kitchen sink using baking soda and vinegar !!

How to unclog a kitchen sink using baking soda and vinegar! In this DIY tutorial, I will show you an easy step-by-step procedure to properly unclog any kitchen sink’s drain using white vinegar and baking soda, two household items that you probably already have at home and that are safe for the environment.

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The baking soda and white vinegar mixture will create a nice foaming action that will help your drain get rid of grease, old soap residue and other deposits, leaving your drain nice and clean!

My plumber suggested that I perform this routine as part of a regular maintenance at least once a year. No need to hire a an expensive plumber to perform this task. Thanks to my tips and tricks, you can do this on your own and FOR FREE! This video will also help you unclog and drain or pipe such as your drains in any sinks in your house including your kitchen and bathroom.

Here’s how to unclog your kitchen sink in 5 easy steps:
1) Pour a pot of boiling water down the drain.
2) Pour 1 cup of baking soda down the drain and let it sit for 5 to 10 minutes.
3) Pour 1 cup of white vinegar down the drain and let the mixture sit for 5 to 10 minutes.
4) Pour a pot of boiling water down the drain.
5) Run hot tap water for 5 minutes to make sure any remaining gunk is cleared out.

That’s it! It’s that simple!

Disclaimer: try these methods with caution and at your own risk. It works for most people, but depending on how bad your clogged drain is, there is no guarantee that it will work. Always seek professional help or advice from a plumber if you're unsure of what is clogging your drain.

Welcome to Pan TheOrganizer, a Youtube channel designed to help people improve different aspects of their lives through fun and entertaining videos!

If you liked this video, click on the thumbs up button. Don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE to my channel if you want to keep on enjoying amazing content like this video. Welcome to the Pan TheOrganizer family!!

Disclaimer:
Use this information at your own risk. Pan TheOrganizer can’t guarantee against improper use or unauthorized modifications of this information. Pan TheOrganizer assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. Pan TheOrganizer recommends safe practices when working on appliances and or with tools seen or implied in this video. Any injury, damage, or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or from the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not Pan TheOrganizer.

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How to Drain and Vent a Bathroom Sink | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey helps add ventilation to a bathroom sink that is unvented.
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Time: 2 hours

Cost: $100

Skill Level: Moderate

Tools:
Water pump pliers [
Basin wrench [
Adjustable wrench [

Shopping List:
New Faucet [
Plumber’s putty [
Flexible supply tubing [
PVC drain piping [
Air emittance valve [
PVC primer [
PVC glue [

Steps:
1. An unvented bathroom sink may have a full S-trap, which may siphon and expose the home to sewer gas.
2. Before doing any plumbing work, turn off the water at the main water supply or at local service valves.
3. Remove the old drain piping.
4. If replacing the faucet, remove that as well.
5. Use plumber’s putty to make a watertight seal on the faucet base plate.
6. Install the faucet per the manufacturer’s instructions.
7. Add flexible supply tubing between the faucet and the shut off valves.
8. Dryfit the PVC drain piping. A P-trap should be used. If venting through the roof is not an option, an air emittance valve can be added at the highest possible place in the cabinet below the sink.
9. Use plumber’s putty on the drain connections to the sink.
10. Prime and glue all PVC pieces for the remainder of the drain.

Resources:
Richard installed the Vega Single Control Centerset Bathroom Faucet in Brushed Nickel [ which is manufactured by Pfister Faucets (

All other parts for this project, including PVC drain piping and an air admittance valve can be purchased from a home center or plumbing supply store.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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How to Drain and Vent a Bathroom Sink | Ask This Old House
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How to Fix Clogged Kitchen Sink That Won't Drain

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How to fix a plugged kitchen sink that won't drain. If your sink is backed up, clogged, and won't drain, this video will show you how to fix it!

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Is Your Drain Clogged? 4 Ways To Clear It

Have a clogged bathtub drain? or a clogged sink? Learn how to unclog a sink. My plumbing vids:
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Replacing a Kitchen Sink | Ask This Old House

Ask This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey helps a homeowner update a kitchen sink.
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Time: 1 hour

Cost: $150

Skill Level:
Moderate

Tools List for Replacing a Kitchen Sink:
Adjustable open end wrench
Adjustable pliers
Screwdriver
Putty knife
Oscillating saw
Caulking gun

Shopping List:
Sink
Faucet
Sink Strainer
Silicone Caulking
Plumber’s Putty
New Shutoffs (if needed)
New Drain Piping (if needed)

Steps:
1. Turn the water to the faucet off at the shutoffs under the sink.
2. Open the faucet to ensure the shutoffs hold. If they don’t, turn off the water at the water main.
3. Use an adjustable open end wrench to remove the supply hoses from the shut off valves.
4. Use adjustable pliers to disconnect the drain piping from the bottom of the sink.
5. Use a screwdriver to loosen the clips that secure the sink to the countertop.
6. Use a putty knife to gently release the connection between the sink and the countertop.
7. Dryfit the new sink in place and modify the opening as needed with an oscillating saw.
8. With the sink out of the opening, perform any repairs needed to the shutoff valves, or replace them.
9. Install the new faucet to the sink based on the faucet manufacturer’s recommendations. Install the water supply hoses while the sink is out too.
10. Turn the sink upside down and spread a bead of silicone caulking around the edge of the sink.
11. Set the sink into the countertop opening.
12. Attach new clips between the sink and countertop.
13. Modify drain piping as needed for the new sink.
14. Spread a bead of plumber’s putty around the sink strainer, set in place, and secure from underneath with a nut. Remove the excess putty that squeezes out.
15. Attach the flexible supply hoses to the shutoff valves and tighten with a wrench.
16. Compete the new drain piping to the sink strainer.
17. Turn the water back on and check for leaks.

Resources:
Richard installed the All-in-One Top Mount Stainless Steel Kitchen sink kit, which is manufactured by Glacier Bay and available at The Home Depot (

All of the supplies for this project, including plumber's putty, shut off valves, flux, solder, supply hoses, and PVC drain piping are available at home centers and plumbing supply stores.

About Ask This Old House TV:
Homeowners have a virtual truckload of questions for us on smaller projects, and we're ready to answer. Ask This Old House solves the steady stream of home improvement problems faced by our viewers—and we make house calls! Ask This Old House features some familiar faces from This Old House, including Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey, and landscape contractor Roger Cook.

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Replacing a Kitchen Sink | Ask This Old House

Unplug a clogged up sink in less than 2 minutes!

How to unplug a clogged up sink in less than 2 minutes. No nasty chemicals to buy. Simple step by step tutorial anyone can do. Works!
To support this channel go to Amazon through the links below and make any purchase:
Get the best prices on products used in the video
Amazon Sink Plunger
Amazon Playtex Handsaver Gloves
Amazon Safer Drain Opener

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#cloggeddrain #DrainBlockages #drainclog

Clogged Drain?

How to do-it-yourself instructional on freeing a clogged drain using a plunger and snake with discussion on the use of a liquid drain opener.
Transcript provided for the hearing impaired:
Today on Repairs101 I've got a sink that won't drain and if you're watching I imagine you've got one, too. I'll take you through your options and show what you can do. I allow the washer to vent into the sink which allows for a build-up of what is just dryer-lint that never made it to the dryer. First line of defense is a plunger. Get a good seal. The plunger is the first line of defense because it's the most eco-friendly choice: use hydraulic pressure to drive through the blockage. Second time trying this and it's not working move to something stronger. This is my snake, inexpensive manual snake that you'll find at any good hardware store. Reason I'm wearing gloves to keep me from coming into contact with the horrible places this little fellow has been. I'm going to unwind and drop it. It's nothing but a spring that's been unwound a bit. It's going to be clear in a few hours. Clear enough that I don't have to bucket it all outside. I'm just going to wait. That's often the best thing you can do with home plumbing. If you can, apply the 24 hour rule which is come back 24 hours later: often organic matter will break down in water in that period of time and clear itself. This isn't going to but it will seep. I've got a Rubbermaid storage bin lid and I'm going to use that to catch the water. Often you undo these by hand. You don't even need a wrench. A lot of options to open that elbow joint. These Channellocks might be overkill. An ordinary pair that you find in anybody's kitchen drawer is all you need. Pipe wrench but they are cumbersome and might damage plastic pipes. There is a new style of pipe wrench. That would be very effective but kind of expensive. I recommend you go with the medium sized Channellocks. If all you've got is a chain wrench or locking chain wrench this will do the job but you're going to have to be careful, as with pipe wrench -- you're dealing with plastics and they don't take a lot. The manufacturer was kind enough to let us know what it is. Slip and Lock Nut Wrench I've had a lot of use for this in boat building. I use it on plastic through-hull fittings. It's a wide jawed adjustable wrench. Very light duty tool. Nice and light you're not as likely to slip and damage a new boat when you're putting in thru-hulls. I'm wearing my respirator with the organic cartridges. Although this isn't a toilet outlet it is connected to all the other toilet outlets in the neighbourhood and the smell coming out of it is ferocious. You're going to want to ventilate the room well and wear a respirator. To my surprise the elbow is clear. The problem is downstream. Before you do anything else you need to shove a rag to plug that hole because the sewage gas is coming up because there's no water trap to stop it. You've got to get something in there fast. I've got my mask on, I've got my gloves on. First thing is back off that nut. I'm going in with the snake. I'm going to use the crank. It's very crude but it works: it allows you to spin. tighten that thumbscrew and the S-turn in the metal allows you to crank then you back it off and feed some more in. It's going a lot further. That is the end. All in but this one foot you see in my hand. I'm going to put my catch-basin here again and slowly pull it out and clean it off. I've got my mask on, my gloves on. I've got a couple of wet rags and my plastic bag ready to receive the snake. Pulling this thing out and feeding it into the bag, cleaning it. This black organic matter, that's what I'm going to avoid coming in contact with and try and catch it all with the rag. Seeing some schmere inside the plastic bag I'm glad I'm using a plastic bag clearly the rag isn't getting it all. I'll put it with the rag and everything in the bag, get this plug back in and get organized to put that water trap back in. You want a nice seat on this seal. Then let this thing pull it down into it. Hopefully that's going to hold. Hand tight is generally tight enough and hand tight on top. This is the critical area here that's going to leak if we have a leak. I'll leave my catch-basin and get some water in it. I don't know that it's running properly but I do know that the trap is full of water the smell can't come from the sewer I can take this dam thing off. It's not over yet, but I'll tell you this: if it doesn't work I'm going to pour Drano down there. That's last line of defence. You might try a product like Drano Max Gel. I've had a lot of success with this in other areas of the house. It's a great product I just wanted to suggest that when you're trying to decide whether or not to use a product like that: consider the fact that the water you're pouring it into is indirectly the same water you're drinking. Sounds like it's going to require more plunging.

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